Tuesday, March 30, 2010

Spring Break Babysitter Bootcamp!


Local Chapter of the American Red Cross Offers

Spring Break Babysitter Bootcamp!


Salt Lake City, UTAH (Tuesday, March 30, 2010)— The American Red Cross in Utah offers girls and boys ages 11 – 15 a Babysitter Bootcamp in early April during Spring break. The multi-day course will be held at the Greater Salt Lake Area Chapter located at 555 East 300 South Suite 200 in Salt Lake City on Monday-Wednesday, April 5-7, 2010. The Bootcamp runs from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. each day.


Participants receive training in:

* Babysitter's Training (certification earned in class)
* CPR - Child & Infant (certification earned in class)
* First Aid (certification earned in class)
* Cat and Dog First Aid
* Preparedness
* Leadership

There are a variety of fun activities, including community speakers, lively discussions, and role plays. This is a great opportunity for youth to make new friends while they learn new and valuable skills. Participants will also receive a Babysitting Boot Camp T-shirt, a Babysitting Essentials Toolkit, and a Babysitter’s Training Handbook complete with an Emergency Reference Guide and CD-Rom.

Monday, March 29, 2010

Know any Heroes in the Ogden area?


OGDEN -- Two years ago, Brad Marden saved his 5-year-old daughter's life when she was choking on a piece of hard candy.His quick action saved his daughter's life and prevented neurological or physiological damage.

Because of his efforts, Marden, of Ogden, received the Local Heroes Award from The American Red Cross of Northern Utah. Now, he gets to help select this year's winners.

"Right now we are looking for nominees for our next awards ceremony," said Stephanie Christiansen, development director of the American Red Cross of Northern Utah.

The awards will be presented at the chapter's Celebration of Local Heroes 2010 breakfast on May 11.

Christiansen said anyone can make a nomination by logging on to www.redcrossutah.org or by emailing stephaniec@redcrossutah.org.

Nominees can include anyone who has done something extraordinary, perhaps saved a life or made a positive difference in the community, Christiansen said. The nominee can be a one-time hero through an act of courage or someone who has given a lifetime of community or international service.

"People commit heroic acts every day, and so many of them go unknown," Christiansen said. "There are some great stories out there, some real diamonds in the rough, and we would like to find these people and give them the recognition they deserve."

The deadline for nominations is March 31. The breakfast will be from 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m at the Eccles Conference Center in Ogden. Tickets are $40 per person or $450 for a table of 10 and can be purchased on the Web site or by calling (801) 627-0000.

Friday, March 26, 2010

Latest Red Cross E-News Update!




An American Red Cross Client as a Child, a Volunteer as an Adult

By Mary Burchett

Eric Kiltz was 14 years old when he watched his house burn down. The house his family was renting in Central Kansas caught on fire due to faulty electrical wiring one chilly October afternoon. When the flames started to rise, he ran to get a bucket of water. After throwing it on the fire to no avail, he decided he needed to get out and get help. He went to a neighbor’s house to call 911. Soon, he saw an American Red Cross emergency response vehicle pulling up to his house.

Eric, who had no idea what the Red Cross did, was home alone at the time and remembered, “This lady came up and put a blanket around me.” The lady was with the Red Cross and gave him and his family vouchers for food, clothing and shelter. “The fire pretty much gutted our entire house,” Eric said. Without renter’s insurance, his family was left with nothing.

Now some 13 years later, Eric is a volunteer at the Red Cross in Utah. Because of the help he received, Eric wants to give back, “I always wanted to volunteer with the Red Cross. A year and half ago I finally said, ‘What have I been waiting for?’” Eric currently volunteers at First Aid Stations, occasionally teaches CPR and helps educate the community about disaster preparedness. Recently he has helped around the chapter with a telethon for Haiti, and with the Day on the Hill event. He is so grateful for the help and support the Red Cross gave to him, and he feels volunteering is a great way to say thanks and to give back.


Haiti and the Economy Bring Dramatic Influx of Volunteers
By Kellie Mieremet

After the devastating earthquake hit Haiti this January, the response from our community to help was inspiring. The Office of Volunteers was buzzing with calls from people wanting to help.

During times of disasters there is usually a surge in spontaneous volunteers. When people called during those first few weeks after the earthquake they were hoping we could send them overseas. We had to tell them we could not send them. However, we encouraged everyone to get trained and registered with the American Red Cross so that they could respond in future disasters, first locally and then nationally. The response was tremendous. In fact, from January 13 to February 17 we received 200 new volunteer applications! We love new volunteers!

About 90 of our new volunteers have already attended a New Volunteer Orientation. More than 35 have already started training for disaster services, have helped out in the office on a weekly basis, or have started taking classes to become certified Red Cross Instructors.


Many of the 200 new volunteers came to us due to the devastation overseas. But, the economoy has played a role as well. With recent unemployment rates, we are seeing individuals who want to be useful and productive while they are not working. Baby Boomers who have recently retired are also looking for ways to actively fill their days. Finally, the government and corporate world are encouraging volunteerism. President Barack Obama has issued a call for individuals to serve their communities. Disney is encouraging volunteerism through its service program, Give a Day. Get a Disney Day.


About 96% of the work of the Red Cross is performed by volunteers, so whatever the reason, we welcome all of our volunteers, old and new.

Disaster Services

Two Gunmen Wreak Havoc in Salt Lake City -- We Have Mass Casualties and Three Dead People are in our Reception Center!

Whew, It’s a Drill!

At a recent drill organized by Salt Lake City Police, 51 Red Cross volunteers and staff participated. The ARES radio team participated as well. The drill scenario was a multiple gunman shootout on TRAX with mass casualties, injuries and an evacuation. The Red Cross offered support with a canteen for emergency responders and a reception center that received up to 60 people.
(OMG! Three of those people were dead on arrival.)


"We had volunteers at many locations including the Red Cross Emergency Operations Center at the Greater Salt Lake Area Chapter, the Reception Center, on scene with an Emergency Response Vehicle for the canteen, the Salt Lake City Police and Fire Incident Command and the Joint Information Center. Through our work in all of these areas, we coordinated our response, gave assistance to those affected by the disaster, delivered food and water to emergency personnel, and worked with the 19 other agencies involved in order to gather and share information." – Kaylan Malm, Disaster Vice Chair

Good News in Tooele

The Chapter now has a Disaster Action Team (DAT) in Tooele. Jeff Shoemaker, an experienced Red Cross volunteer from Virginia, has taken on the role of DAT lead. He is working with Larry Russon, our very dedicated local chapter volunteer, to organize and promote the Red Cross in Tooele County. They will be contacting and organizing current volunteers in Tooele County and will be reaching out to the community to recruit and train additional volunteers. It was serendipitous that the day after DAT supplies were signed out to Jeff, he was sent to respond to a local fire. Great timing! This is a most welcome addition to our chapter.


Mary Matthiessen, a 19-year Red Crosser, Makes a Move
By Kara Taggart

With much appreciation, we say goodbye to Mary Matthiessen who will be leaving the Greater Salt Lake Area Chapter at the end of the month. She has accepted a position as Senior Manager of Preparedness at the American Red Cross Heartland Chapter in Omaha, Nebraska.

Mary has been a part of the American Red Cross team since 1991. Mary started her career working in Alaska and Michigan, both in Health & Safety and Emergency Prevention Education roles. She then became the Health and Safety Director for the Cornhusker Chapter in Lincoln, Nebraska for seven years, and then moved onto be the Health & Safety Business Capacity Development Sr. Associate for the West Service Area in Las Vegas for four years before she came to Salt Lake. She has been the Health and Safety Director for the Greater Salt Lake Area Chapter since January of 2008. Her experience and expertise in the organization has prepared thousands of people in Utah.

We would like to take the time to thank Mary for her hard work and influence in the state of Utah. She will be returning to her husband’s home state of Nebraska the first week of April. Her warm smile and laugh will be missed by her fellow coworkers, volunteers and friends. We are excited for her and wish her the very best in her new adventure. Thank you Mary for all you did for the chapter, you will surely be missed!


Fundraising News!

Disaster Fundraising


By Neva Baker

In the aftermath of the Haiti Earthquake there has been an unprecedented outpouring of financial support from individuals and groups throughout the state of Utah. To date, Utahns have generously opened their hearts, wallets and pockets to provide financial assistance to the largest international Red Cross humanitarian relief effort since the Tsunami of 2004. Here in Utah, people have reached out with personal donations, as well as supporting fundraisers that have been held by corporations, local schools, grocery stores and food markets, music and dance clubs, and local restaurants. Currently, more than $1 million has been raised in Utah to support relief aid to Haiti, and funds are also being raised for Chile. We express our heartfelt thanks to more than 60 groups who organized outside fundraisers, to corporations who matched employee gifts, to individuals who donated stock and personal funds. Thank you! Thank you for giving of your time, talents, and financial support. Thank you for supporting the mission of the American Red Cross to help provide relief, prevent and prepare individuals and communities for disaster and emergencies.

Heroes 2010

An important part of our mission is to train individuals with the necessary skills to save lives, and help our communities prepare for emergencies. At the Annual Heroes Event, we recognize local heroes who have saved a life or made our community a better place to live. Please visit our website and learn about those wonderful Heroes, like Sgt. 1st Class Brady Johnson, who was prepared with the right equipment and skills to save the life of cyclist Dave Collins. Or the youth from South Jordan who came to the rescue of their classmate in an emergency at a swimming pool. This year, we recognized Paula Green Johnson (pictured) with our Lifetime Achievement Award. Paula has volunteered countless hours in this community, giving of her time, talent, and philanthropic support to help organizations where the need is greatest. Enjoy learning about these heroes, check out their stories and videos, click here.

As always, we need your help to support our mission. Take a class, be prepared, volunteer and donate to support your local Red Cross.

Take A Class
Be Prepared
Volunteer

Tuesday, March 23, 2010

video

Floods happen in Utah! It’s important for us all to prepare ourselves and our families for rising water. Here are some tips to get you started:

Know What to Expect
Know your area's flood risk. If unsure, call your local Red Cross chapter, emergency management office, or planning and zoning department.
Check to see if you have insurance that covers flooding. If not, find out how to get flood insurance.

Keep insurance policies, documents, and other valuables in a safe-deposit box.
If it has been raining hard for several hours, or steadily raining for several days, be alert to the possibility of a flood. Listen to local radio or TV stations for flood information.

Reduce Potential Flood Damage
Raise your furnace, water heater, and electric panel if they are in areas of your home that may be flooded.

Consult with a professional for further information if this and other damage reduction measures can be taken.

Assemble a Disaster Supplies Kit

First aid kit and essential medications.

Food Items. Select food that lasts a long time. If canned food, pack a can opener.
At least three gallons of water per person

Protective clothing, rainwear, and bedding or sleeping bags.

Battery-powered radio, flashlight, and extra batteries.
Special items for infants, elderly, or disabled family members.

Written instructions for how to turn off electricity, gas and water if authorities advise you to do so. (Remember, you'll need a professional to turn them back on.)

Identify where you could go if told to evacuate. Choose several places such as a friend's home in another town, a motel or a shelter.

Flood Watch versus Flood Warning

A flood WATCH means a flood is possible in your area. If a flood watch is issued:

Move your furniture and valuables to higher floors of your home.

Fill your car's gas tank, in case an evacuation notice is issued.

Be alert to signs of flash flooding and be ready to evacuate on a moment's notice.

A flood WARNING means flooding is already occurring or will occur soon in your area. If a flood warning is issued:

Listen to local radio and TV stations for information and advice. If told to evacuate, do so as soon as possible.

If you think it has already started, evacuate immediately. You may have only seconds to escape. Act quickly!

Move to higher ground away from rivers, streams, creeks, and storm drains. Do not drive around barricades they are there for your safety.

If your car stalls in rapidly rising waters, abandon it immediately and climb to higher ground.

Monday, March 22, 2010

Earthquake Preparedness Seminar: Utah Valley residents are invited to attend an Earthquake Preparedness Seminar at the Red Cross Building in Provo on Thursday March 25 at 7 p.m.

Presentations will be given on potential earthquakes in Utah Valley and earthquake preparedness by T. Leslie Youd, Professor Emeritus at Brigham Young University, and Laurie Castillo, American Red Cross Disaster Action Team Captain.

Come learn how to prepare for an earthquake, and what to do during and after an earthquake strikes.

Friday, March 19, 2010

American Red Cross Disaster Volunteer Packs Her Bags to Help with the New Jersey Floods


Cedar City, UTAH (Friday, March 19, 2010) The Mountain Valley Chapter of the American Red Cross is deploying a disaster trained volunteer to help with disaster relief for the New Jersey Floods. Evelyn Halstead of Cedar City is packing her bags and getting ready for the trip in the morning. At this hour, she doesn’t have many details as to where she will be or exactly what she will be doing, but she knows she will be helping people affected by the flooding. Many people there have lost everything due to the floods. Halstead is an experienced Red Cross volunteer and has been on disaster relief deployments before.


About the American Red Cross in Utah: The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and counsels victims of disasters; teaches lifesaving skills; supplies blood to 30 area hospitals; and supports military members and their families. The organization also provides emergency utility assistance and international family tracing services. The American Red Cross is a nonprofit organization, not a government funded agency, which depends entirely upon volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its humanitarian mission. Donate your time or resources to your local Red Cross: Mountain Valley Chapter/Provo (801) 373-8580, Northern Utah Chapter/Ogden (801) 627-0000, Cache Valley Area/Logan (435)752-1125, Greater Salt Lake Area Chapter 801-323-7000. Visit www.utahredcross.org click on “Across Utah.”

Utah Volunteer Deploys to New Jersey to help with the floods



March 19, 2010

Cedar City, UTAH (Friday, March 19, 2010) The Mountain Valley Chapter of the American Red Cross is deploying a disaster trained volunteer to help with disaster relief for the New Jersey Floods. Evelyn Halstead of Cedar City is packing her bags and getting ready for the trip in the morning. At this hour, she doesn’t have many details as to where she will be or exactly what she will be doing, but she knows she will be helping people affected by the flooding. Many people there have lost everything due to the floods.

Halstead is an experienced Red Cross volunteer and has been on disaster relief deployments before.

About the American Red Cross in Utah: The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and counsels victims of disasters; teaches lifesaving skills; supplies blood to 30 area hospitals; and supports military members and their families. The organization also provides emergency utility assistance and international family tracing services.

The American Red Cross is a nonprofit organization, not a government funded agency, which depends entirely upon volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its humanitarian mission. Donate your time or resources to your local Red Cross: Mountain Valley Chapter/Provo (801) 373-8580, Northern Utah Chapter/Ogden (801) 627-0000, Cache Valley Area/Logan (435)752-1125, Greater Salt Lake Area Chapter 801-323-7000. Visit www.utahredcross.org click on Across Utah.

Today I took a class at the Greater Salt Lake Area Chapter of the American Red Cross called International Humanitarian Law, Humanity in the Midst of War. Not only did I learn a lot about International Humanitarian Law (IHL) I also learned about how the Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies around the world provide assistance during times of combat.

I started my year of service with the Red Cross in January and everyday I am continually impressed and surprised by the amount of work that is carried out here and abroad. As another volunteer also mentioned today, I feel humbled and excited to be involved with such an amazing organization. Today’s class opened my eyes to the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies and all that they do for the world. Often we are blinded to this international network when we talk about the Red Cross. Many, including myself until today, associate that Red Cross emblem with the United States. However, we are only one of 186 countries with a Red Cross or Red Crescent Society.

International Humanitarian Law’s main purpose is to alleviate the human suffering brought on by war. The Geneva Conventions and the Protocols that have been added protect all victims of war no matter what side of the conflict, what race, religion, gender, or culture they belong to. They provide services to those soldiers in the field and at sea, respect and proper treatment of Prisoners of War and services to civilians affected by conflict.

It is impossible for me to sum up all that I learned and all the services that the International Societies provide. I encourage you all to get further information, resources and facts that can be found on the American Red Cross website

http://www.redcross.org/portal/site/en/menuitem.d8aaecf214c576bf971e4cfe43181aa0/?vgnextoid=22874749b48bb110VgnVCM10000089f0870aRCRD&vgnextfmt=default

Thursday, March 18, 2010

Sergeant 1st Class Brady Johnson was honored on March 3rd, 2010 at our annual Heroes event. Read his inspiring story below and watch his interview from yesterday's live segment on KJZZ. It was pure luck that Sergeant First Class Brady Johnson was on his way up American Fork Canyon at the same time as a group of cyclists participating in the 1,000 Warriors bike race for wounded veterans. Brady, a trained medic for the National Guard, noticed a group of people gathered around an injured biker and soon heard someone call for help. Without hesitation, he grabbed his medic aid bag from the back of his car and saw a biker face down on the ground. That biker was Dave Collins from Mesa, Arizona. The sergeant, along with medically trained cyclists at the scene, rolled Dave over and realized the extent of his injuries. With the help of the trained riders, they opened his airway and Dave started breathing on his own. However, he was cut from his jugular to his sternum with two gaping holes in his neck. Brady grabbed bandages and gauze from his bag and packed the wounds, applying pressure to stop the bleeding. His Green Beret training taught him to maintain this pressure until an ambulance arrived. Brady does not know how long he did this. For him time was irrelevant. He had to do what he could until the paramedics arrived and that was all that mattered. Dave could have bled to death. Dave feels so blessed and fortunate that a number of qualified individuals on the scene were not only willing to stop and help but incredibly qualified to treat his wounds. Dave said, “It was literally a miracle that everyone knew what to do and how to handle the situation.” If all of those people had not been there at the exact time of the crash and without Brady’s medical supplies, this story might have a very different ending. He shared, “I am forever indebted to Brady and all of those who rendered help at the scene.
video

Tuesday, March 16, 2010


Grateful Client and Current Volunteer

Eric Kiltz was fourteen years old when he watched his house burn down. The house his family was renting in Central Kansas caught on fire due to faulty electrical wiring one chilly October afternoon. When the flames started to rise, Eric ran to get a bucket of water. After throwing it on the fire to no avail, he decided he needed to get out and get help. He went to a neighbor’s house to call 911.

Eric, soon saw a Red Cross emergency response vehicle pulling up to his house.
Eric, who had no idea what the Red Cross did, was home alone at the time and remembered, “This lady came up and put a blanket around me.” The lady was with the Red Cross and gave him and his family vouchers for Wal-Mart and a hotel room. “The fire pretty much gutted our entire house,” Eric said. Without renter’s insurance, Eric’s family was left with nothing. It was thanks to the Red Cross assistance that Eric’s family was able to pick up the pieces. The Red Cross even worked with the media to share the story of what happened and asked for donations of toys and model kits for Eric. As a result, strangers started donating items to Eric and his family.

Now some thirteen years later, Eric is a volunteer at the Red Cross in Utah. Because of the help the Red Cross gave to him, Eric wants to give back, “I always wanted to volunteer with the Red Cross. A year and half ago I finally said, ‘What have I been waiting for?’” Eric currently volunteers at First Aid Stations, occasionally teaches CPR and helps educate the community about disaster preparedness. Recently he has helped around the chapter with a telethon for Haiti, and with the Day on the Hill event. He is so grateful for the help and support the Red Cross gave to him, and he feels volunteering is a great way to say thanks and to give back.

To volunteer with the Red Cross go to www.utahredcross.org and click on the blue Volunteer tab.

Monday, March 15, 2010


National Headquarters just released a Two-Month Haiti Update.

Here are some quick facts at a glance:

In the two months since the earthquake, the global Red Cross
network has:
• Provided relief items for 400,000 people.
• Handed out nearly 99,000 tarps, tents and toolkits.
• Supplied meals for more than 1 million people.
• Distributed 40 million liters of clean drinking water.
• Built more than 1,100 latrines.
• Helped vaccinate more than 125,000 people.
• Coordinated the shipment of more than 1,800 units of blood to
medical facilities.
• Treated more than 55,000 people at Red Cross hospitals or
mobile clinics.
• Sent more than 23 million text messages with critical health
advice to survivors.
• Received more than 28,400 registrations on its family linking
Web site.
• Assisted more than 25,000 people who arrived in the U.S.
following the earthquake.
• Deployed more than 600 responders to Haiti.

Check out www.redcross.org to download the report.

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Friday, March 12, 2010


Salt Lake City, UTAH ( Thursday, March 11, 2010)— The Greater Salt Lake Area Chapter of the American Red Cross is on its way to help several people right now after a fire left two, posibly three, mobile homes uninhabitable. The fire occurred in the 100 block of North Silversage, Vernon, Tooele. Three adults and two children are affected. American Red Cross disaster action team volunteers are helping the homeowners as needed with essential needs like clothing, food and shelter.

The American Red Cross in Utah responded to 114 incidents this past year, some of them rendering multiple families homeless. Nationwide, the American Red Cross’s local chapters help victims of major and minor disasters by offering immediate comfort, which may include food, a warm place to stay, clothing and other life necessities. Volunteers give comfort kits to victims of fire, flood or other disasters. The kits include helpful items like toothbrushes, toothpaste and a toy for children.

Help people affected by disasters, like this fire, by donating to the American Red Cross Disaster Relief Fund, or your local Chapter. On those rare occasions when donations exceed Red Cross expenses for a specific disaster, contributions are used to prepare for and serve victims of other disasters.

About the American Red Cross, Greater Salt Lake Area Chapter:
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and counsels victims of disasters; teaches lifesaving skills; provides blood to 30 area hospitals; and supports military members and their families. The organization also provides emergency utility assistance and international family tracing services. The American Red Cross is a nonprofit organization, not a government funded agency, which depends entirely upon volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its humanitarian mission. Donate your time or resources to the Greater Salt Lake Area Chapter of the American Red Cross by calling 801-323-7000 or visit www.utahredcross.org

Thursday, March 11, 2010

Glendal Middle School raised over $2700 for the Red Cross relief efforts in Haiti. They were featured on Fox news as the Cool School of the Week! We applaud their efforts and say a big THANK YOU for all the work they did for those in Haiti!

Check out the video of the school handing over their check to the Red Cross

 

Wednesday, March 10, 2010


Fundraiser for Chile:


Saturday, March 13th from 02:00 to 8:00 PM:
Local artists including bands and dance groups will perform and Chilean food. Organized and sponsored by West Valley City – Utah Cultural Celebration Center, Latino Community Information Center and the Chilean Community and the local American Red Cross.
Located at the Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 West 3100 South, West Valley City.

More ways to donate: www.redcross.org, 1-800-REDCROSS, text “Chile” to 90999,
or for Spanish call: 1-800-257-7575

You can help the victims of countless crises, like the recent earthquakes in Chile and Haiti, around the world each year by making a financial gift to the American Red Cross International Response Fund, which will provide immediate relief and long-term support through supplies, technical assistance and other support to help those in need. The American Red Cross honors donor intent. If you wish to designate your donation to a specific disaster, please do so at the time of your donation by mailing your donation with the designation to the American Red Cross, P.O. Box 37243, Washington, D.C. 20013 or to your local American Red Cross chapter. Donations to the International Response Fund can be made by phone at 1-800-REDCROSS or 1-800-257-7575 (Spanish) or online at www.redcross.org or www.cruzrojaamericana.org.

Tuesday, March 9, 2010


Floods happen in Utah! It’s important for us all to prepare ourselves and our families for rising water. Here are some tips to get you started:

Know What to Expect•Know your area's flood risk. If unsure, call your local Red Cross chapter, emergency management office, or planning and zoning department.

•Check to see if you have insurance that covers flooding. If not, find out how to get flood insurance.

•Keep insurance policies, documents, and other valuables in a safe-deposit box.

•If it has been raining hard for several hours, or steadily raining for several days, be alert to the possibility of a flood. Listen to local radio or TV stations for flood information.

Reduce Potential Flood Damage
•Raise your furnace, water heater, and electric panel if they are in areas of your home that may be flooded.

•Consult with a professional for further information if this and other damage reduction measures can be taken.

Assemble a Disaster Supplies Kit

•First aid kit and essential medications.

•Food Items. Select food that lasts a long time. If canned food, pack a can opener.

•At least three gallons of water per person

•Protective clothing, rainwear, and bedding or sleeping bags.

•Battery-powered radio, flashlight, and extra batteries.

•Special items for infants, elderly, or disabled family members.

•Written instructions for how to turn off electricity, gas and water if authorities advise you to do so. (Remember, you'll need a professional to turn them back on.)

•Identify where you could go if told to evacuate. Choose several places such as a friend's home in another town, a motel or a shelter.
Flood Watch versus Flood Warning

•A flood WATCH means a flood is possible in your area. If a flood watch is issued:
◦Move your furniture and valuables to higher floors of your home.
◦Fill your car's gas tank, in case an evacuation notice is issued.
◦Be alert to signs of flash flooding and be ready to evacuate on a moment's notice.

•A flood WARNING means flooding is already occurring or will occur soon in your area. If a flood warning is issued:
◦Listen to local radio and TV stations for information and advice. If told to evacuate, do so as soon as possible.
◦If you think it has already started, evacuate immediately. You may have only seconds to escape. Act quickly!
◦Move to higher ground away from rivers, streams, creeks, and storm drains. Do not drive around barricades they are there for your safety.
◦If your car stalls in rapidly rising waters, abandon it immediately and climb to higher ground.

Thursday, March 4, 2010

American Red Cross Delivers Critical Support to Chile


American Red Cross Delivers Critical Support to Chile

Call for Donations is Underway



Salt Lake City, Utah (Thursday, March 04, 2010) — Utahns can help the disaster relief efforts in Chile through the American Red Cross. Following a request made yesterday for international assistance from the Chilean Red Cross, the American Red Cross is now accepting donations specifically for response and recovery in Chile. The public can donate online through www.redcross.org, through calls to 1-800-REDCROSS, and by texting “CHILE” to 90999. People may also call 1-800-257-7575 to make a donation in Spanish. The American Red Cross has increased its pledge to $250,000 for relief operations in Chile following Saturday’s 8.8 magnitude earthquake.



Utah Region American Red Cross CEO Maxine Margaritis said, “Our hearts go out to the people of Chile as they cope with the aftermath of the earthquake and the many aftershocks. The Red Cross received the Chilean request for international assistance yesterday and we are happy to help raise funds here in Utah to help the people of Chile.”



More than 2 million people are affected and an estimated 500,000 homes are destroyed with 1.5 million homes damaged. Communications and electricity are slowly being restored in Santiago but still remain out in the hardest hit areas. The airport in Santiago has reopened.



The International Red Cross has launched a Family Links Website aimed at helping people in Chile and abroad to register the names of relatives with whom they wish to restore contact. People seeking news from their loved ones can register directly on the site at: https//www.icrc.org/familylinks.



This Saturday, the Salt Lake City affiliate of Azteca America television partners with the Red Cross to host a Spanish telethon from 6p.m. to 10 p.m. to raise funds for Chile and Haiti.



Disaster relief efforts continue to support the massive relief operations in Haiti, where more than 1.3 million people have been helped since the January 12th earthquake in that country.





You can help the victims of countless crises, like the recent earthquakes in Chile and Haiti, around the world each year by making a financial gift to the American Red Cross International Response Fund, which will provide immediate relief and long-term support through supplies, technical assistance and other support to help those in need. The American Red Cross honors donor intent. If you wish to designate your donation to a specific disaster, please do so at the time of your donation by mailing your donation with the designation to the American Red Cross, P.O. Box 37243, Washington, D.C. 20013 or to your local American Red Cross chapter. Donations to the International Response Fund can be made by phone at 1-800-REDCROSS or 1-800-257-7575 (Spanish) or online at www.redcross.org or www.cruzrojaamericana.org.

Tuesday, March 2, 2010

2010 Red Cross Heroes Events


Greater Salt Lake Area Chapter of the American Red Cross

2010 Red Cross Heroes Events – Reception Tonight and Luncheon/Awards Ceremony Tomorrow

Ordinary local citizens who have done something extraordinary to save a life or make the community a better and safer place to live.



Salt Lake City, UTAH (Tuesday, March 02, 2010) — The American Red Cross Greater Salt Lake Area Chapter 2010 Heroes will be awarded at the American Red Cross Heroes Event sponsored by UnitedHealthcare, tomorrow, on March 3rd at the Salt Palace Convention Center in the Grand Ballroom at 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. in Salt Lake City. Tonight a special reception and rehearsal for the heroes will be held at 5:30 p.m. at the same location.



And the 2010 American Red Cross Heroes are…




Tanya Shroeder – Imagine throwing yourself in front of a train to save the life of a child. But the train is a 90-pound pit bull. Tanya disregarded her own personal safety to save a four-year old and her own two children from an angry dog that broke through their fence and waged war on them in their backyard. At one point, the pit bull had the four-year old pinned to the ground by the neck. Tanya pried the dog off of the child. The brave mom suffered many bites and braved a series of attacks from the pit bull, but in the end, they all reached safety. She earns the Family Hero Award.



100 First Aid Kits in Haiti – Salt Lake City Fire Station 8 joined the International Aid Servicing Kids to assemble 100 First Aid Kits to give to locals in Haiti. Captain Rick Black travelled to Haiti where he delivered the kits, treated 1300 villagers (57% of them children) and instructed first aid to locals. This group receives the International Good Samaritan award. At the time, they had no idea Haiti would soon suffer a devastating earthquake.



Shooting Victim - Ruben Martinez suffered from a life-altering incident. He was mistaken for a gang member and brutally shot. After months in the hospital and multiple surgeries, he could have retaliated with anger, but instead joined efforts to help troubled youth in his community. He diligently served as a leader for other teens at Youth Works. He is the Youth Good Samaritan.



Radio to the Rescue - Hal Whiting was in the middle of nowhere near the Arizona border when someone flagged him down for help. An ATV accident victim was seriously injured, help was far away and cell phones were out of range. Hal used his ham radio equipment and his training to get help and save a life. Hal receives the Wilderness Hero Award.



The Park City 5 –Coincidentally, five moms in Park City lose their teens to a variety of unexpected deaths in a short period of time. They band together to mourn and to honor their lost children. The moms raise funds and build a needed school in Ecuador. Now, the group has raised enough to build a total of five schools. They receive the International Humanitarian Award.



Kathy Jo Hall – 911 dispatcher Kathy Jo Hall helped two men whose boat capsized on the Great Salt Lake in January 2009. Hall’s calming influence in a dramatic 911 call made it possible to get GPS coordinates to the rescuers. Kathy Jo is the Law Enforcement Hero.



On the Road – Driving home from work, Jason Day saw a car on fire with a woman inside. He braved the fire and a possible explosion to pull her from the car to safety. He and another man on the scene tried to put out the fire, but four minutes after the woman was free from the car, it erupted in flames. The Adult Good Samaritan Award goes to Jason.



School Bus Nightmare – A school bus loaded with children on a field trip is rolling down the interstate in the St. George area. The bus driver loses consciousness. A teacher and two chaperones work together to steer the bus to safety. Children’s lives were saved. Jan and Laura Graf and Ben Smith are awarded the Adult Good Samaritan Award.



Teen Rescue – J.J. Larson and six friends perform an emergency medical rescue at a swimming pool, saving the life of Bailee Robinson. The girl suffered a seizure and sank to the bottom of the pool. The group of friends pulled her out of the water, called 911 and J.J. put her in a rescue position. J.J. put his Boy Scout First Aid training into action. The youth win the Medical Rescue Award.





Preparedness Team – Taylorsville Volunteers Donna Pittman & Lisa Schwartz prepared their community for a large catastrophic disaster. Donna led the efforts and serves as the volunteer chair for public safety and Lisa divided the city into sections and prepared a team of individuals to be able to respond when needed. They win the Community Safety Heroes Award.



Military Hero – Sgt. Brady Johnson was headed for a family picnic in American Fork Canyon, when he came upon an emergency in the midst of a bike racing event on the road. He helped save the life of cyclist Dave Collins after a bicycle/SUV accident. Others on the scene thought Dave was deceased. But Brady and others used their medical training to assess the injuries and get the man breathing again. Dave had a gash from his jugular all the way to his sternum. Brady was trained as an army medic in the Green Beret and had his first aid bag with him. He packed Dave’s wounds with gauze and held them in place to prevent him from bleeding to death until medics arrived. Brady receives the Military Hero Award.



Lifetime Achievement Award– Each year several heroes are honored by the American Red Cross. Only one of them receives a special award for a lifetime of heroic achievement. This year, that award goes to Paula Green Johnson who has served her community for 25 years as a volunteer. Paula has helped several worthy causes. She has personally led major projects, taken on leadership roles, and helped save many children in Africa by supporting the International Red Cross Measles Initiative. She even travelled to Ghana to help with the project. She serves by leading and mentoring. She was selected as this year’s Lifetime Achievement Award winner for sharing her time, treasure and many talents with the American Red Cross and other local nonprofit organizations. If you play six degrees of separation, this woman has probably touched the lives of nearly everyone in the Salt Lake area.



Selection Information - The finalists were chosen by a special Selection Committee made up of the following members: Governor Gary R. Herbert, Salt Lake County Mayor Peter Corroon, Pastor France Davis -Calvary Baptist Church, Natalie Gochnour - COO Salt Lake Chamber, and Lynn Samsel - Director of Emergency Services, LDS Humanitarian Services.



See the Stories! To view stories, photos and videos for the 12 awards, visit www.utahredcross.org and click on “Heroes.”





This is the most important fundraiser for the local Chapter each year. Attendance expected is 350.

The Luncheon is not open to the public, guests RSVP’d and purchased tickets ahead of time.

Media is welcome at both events.